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Ancient humans living between 12,000 and 15,000 years ago in what is now Northern Israel were using sophisticated hooks, lines, weights, and lures to catch fish, a new analysis published to PLoS ONE reveals.

Ancient humans living between 12,000 and 15,000 years ago in what is now Northern Israel were using sophisticated hooks, lines, weights, and lures to catch fish, a new analysis published to PLoS ONE reveals.

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32 Comments

  1. Indigenous Australians at that time had created a sophisticated aerodynamic hunting tool, the boomerang (not surpassed in its aerodynamic capabilities till the early 20th century), they used primarily to replicate the hovering of a hawk over flocks of water foul in order to make them fly low and direct them in to nets strung between two trees. You can keep your fishing hooks, lines, weights, and lures.

  2. Interesting that hook nr. 5 has barbs on the lower part of the hook, where the bone has enough thickness to allow for a more “advanced” design.

    Modern hooks have barbs on the end of the hook, which is probably more efficient but also much more difficult when making a hook out of bone.

  3. Check out the hooks of the Pacific Northwest Indigenous people. The designs are so complex for hooks to catch things like halibut. I always wondered how my ancestors came about the designs – especially for a fish like a halibut.

  4. A lot of tech is probably older than we think. It’s called the Stone Age because they used stone tools, but that is mostly because the stone tools survive longest. It’s anyone’s guess how long less rugged tools have been in use.

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